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Shine (2016)

Shine (2016)

SHINE, by artist C. Jacqueline Wood, utilizes crowd-sourced media to examine a single subject from multiple perspectives. The setting sun is a moment each day that all people have the opportunity to see and appreciate. Using this universal, daily occurrence as a photographic focus, SHINE attempted to equalize art-making. All people in the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky region were asked to contribute to the photo campaign, titled City Shine, which capitalized on social media and the prevalence of cell phone cameras to “democratize” the art-making process. In the end, we received over 1,000 images by more than 400 contributors! 

Developed and executed by C. Jacqueline Wood and a team of ArtWorks Apprentices, City Shine cultivated a community of participants, united by this one simple task every evening during the month of August 2016.  The photographs, collected through City Shine, create a multi-faceted portrait of our city and the people who live here.  The project also empowered residents to be mindful of their environment and surroundings, ultimately upholding their unique perspective as a crucial part of telling our collective story. 

The very act of taking a picture, as you can see from the images, plays on the differences and similarities of those visions and perspectives. Grouping the photos by date also helps to examine the use of a photograph as a “document,” questioning the many variables that challenge the “factual” accuracy of an event.

Today, visual media is most often experienced on a scrolling screen and the brevity of these encounters limits our appreciation of individual voices and perspectives. The collection of City Shine photographs changes this trajectory by creating a tangible archive gleaned from 31 fleeting moments. Ultimately, the display and attribution of each individual contributor brings an increased appreciation to these images and the people who took them.

SHINE, the resulting video by C. Jacqueline Wood, is an artistic representation of the City Shine archive. The value of each image is further heightened for its role in the creation of a new work of art. The final iteration of SHINE is projected outdoors for all to see, not limited by the walls of a gallery. The exterior projection of the video is just one way that the project examines the concepts of access and ability as it relates to the process of art creation, execution, and exhibition.

Like the public art murals that ArtWorks paints, SHINE illuminates a blank facade, transforming our city and celebrating the power of the creative process. SHINE is a reminder that every voice matters; every story matters and that our connection to each other is as universal and true as the setting sun. 

CityShine Photos

CityShine Photos

IMG_6948.jpg
42˚57'43"N, 85˚40'14"W (2010)

42˚57'43"N, 85˚40'14"W (2010)

Blue Green (2007-2011)

Blue Green (2007-2011)

5 min. loop, single channel video

A short work examining the setting sun using an in-camera-edit transitioning technique. The aesthetic evokes the ethereaI quality of nature, experimenting with the interact ion between sunlight and the mechanics of the camera lens.

I Will Always Love You (2012)

I Will Always Love You (2012)

nine-channel video installation Encore Records, Ann Arbor, MI

ANN ARBOR FILM FESTIVAL 50 SCREENS

March 9th-April 1st, 2012

Preservation Experiment (Frieze Frame) (2006)

Preservation Experiment (Frieze Frame) (2006)

EXPAND: THE ARCHIVE PROJECT

multi-channel video installation Frieze Building, Ann Arbor, MI

A celebration of the historic Frieze Building before it was demolished. With both audio and visual contributions from the community, and sound compiled by Heather Radke, Frieze Frame projected archival images of the building onto its facade. The work created a space for viewers to reflect on the personal and collective experience of a long-standing architectural landmark that was soon to disappear.

HAVE IT YOUR WAY (2008)

HAVE IT YOUR WAY (2008)

18 min. loop, nine-channel video 1482 N. Milwaukee, Chicago IL May 2-3, 2008

A si te -specific video installation, using multiple projectors to  illuminate a now demolished building in the Wicker Park neighborhood of Chicago. All the footage derives from the surrounding space, and the silhouettes represent how the physical body absorbs the urban environment.

After All the Tragedies are Over (2009)

After All the Tragedies are Over (2009)

Collaboration w/ Kate Clark & Ben Love OX-BOW AT WORK, Saugatuck, MI

A collaborative work using multiple sculptural elements inspired by the themes of a D. H. Lawrence poem.

The primary structure utilizes a pin-hole technique, as viewers peer  into a mysterious nautical world, centered around a found canoe skeleton.

 

AFTER ALL THE TRAGEDIES ARE OVER--

After all the tragedies are over and worn out and a man can no longer feel heroic about being a Hamlet--

When love is gone, and desire is dead, and tragedy has left the heart then grief and pain go too, withdrawing from the heart and leaving strange cold stretches of sand.

So a man no longer knows his own heart; he might say into the twilight: What is it? I am here, yet m y heart is bare and utterly empty. I have passed from existence, I feel nothing any more. I am a nonentity.- -

Yet, when the time has come to be nothing, how good it is to be nothing! a waste expanse of nothing, like wide foreshores where not a ripple is left and the sea is lost in the lapse of the lowest of tides.

Ah, when I have seen myself left by life, left nothing!

Yet, even waste, grey foreshores, sand, and sorry far out clay are sea-bread still, through their hour of bare denuding.

It is the moon that turns the tides. The beaches can do nothing about it.

-D.H. Lawrence (Pansies, 1929)

Untitled Train Installation (2005)

Untitled Train Installation (2005)

20 min. loop, two channel video Bandamer Park, Ann Arbor, MI, December 2005

An installation located at a cross-section of movement and transportation, using imagery from the surrounding space to comment on the ever-changing landscape. The work uses a passing train as a projection surface to explore the ephemerality of the art experience.

Home/Life Experiment/Performance (2006)

Home/Life Experiment/Performance (2006)

EXPAND: THE ARCHIVE PROJECT

3 hours, 8 channel video installation 205 N. Division, Ann Arbor, MI April 13, 2006

An exploration of the relationship between the physical body, archit ecture, and the internalized understanding of home. The work projects images of domestic spaces onto the windows of the artist's actual home.

Womb Experiment (2006)

Womb Experiment (2006)

EXPAND: THE ARCHIVE PROJECT

22 min., nine video projectors, Angell Hall Planetarium, UM Campus, April 24, 2006

A disjointed, yet synced, 360-degree image with nine projectors, utilizing the architecture of the planetarium to envelop the viewer.

With sound by Tom Meluch, and performers from the University of Michigan Dance Department, the work uses fetal development as a structuring device to create a womb-like atmosphere.

Shine (2016)

SHINE, by artist C. Jacqueline Wood, utilizes crowd-sourced media to examine a single subject from multiple perspectives. The setting sun is a moment each day that all people have the opportunity to see and appreciate. Using this universal, daily occurrence as a photographic focus, SHINE attempted to equalize art-making. All people in the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky region were asked to contribute to the photo campaign, titled City Shine, which capitalized on social media and the prevalence of cell phone cameras to “democratize” the art-making process. In the end, we received over 1,000 images by more than 400 contributors! 

Developed and executed by C. Jacqueline Wood and a team of ArtWorks Apprentices, City Shine cultivated a community of participants, united by this one simple task every evening during the month of August 2016.  The photographs, collected through City Shine, create a multi-faceted portrait of our city and the people who live here.  The project also empowered residents to be mindful of their environment and surroundings, ultimately upholding their unique perspective as a crucial part of telling our collective story. 

The very act of taking a picture, as you can see from the images, plays on the differences and similarities of those visions and perspectives. Grouping the photos by date also helps to examine the use of a photograph as a “document,” questioning the many variables that challenge the “factual” accuracy of an event.

Today, visual media is most often experienced on a scrolling screen and the brevity of these encounters limits our appreciation of individual voices and perspectives. The collection of City Shine photographs changes this trajectory by creating a tangible archive gleaned from 31 fleeting moments. Ultimately, the display and attribution of each individual contributor brings an increased appreciation to these images and the people who took them.

SHINE, the resulting video by C. Jacqueline Wood, is an artistic representation of the City Shine archive. The value of each image is further heightened for its role in the creation of a new work of art. The final iteration of SHINE is projected outdoors for all to see, not limited by the walls of a gallery. The exterior projection of the video is just one way that the project examines the concepts of access and ability as it relates to the process of art creation, execution, and exhibition.

Like the public art murals that ArtWorks paints, SHINE illuminates a blank facade, transforming our city and celebrating the power of the creative process. SHINE is a reminder that every voice matters; every story matters and that our connection to each other is as universal and true as the setting sun. 

CityShine Photos

42˚57'43"N, 85˚40'14"W (2010)

Blue Green (2007-2011)

5 min. loop, single channel video

A short work examining the setting sun using an in-camera-edit transitioning technique. The aesthetic evokes the ethereaI quality of nature, experimenting with the interact ion between sunlight and the mechanics of the camera lens.

I Will Always Love You (2012)

nine-channel video installation Encore Records, Ann Arbor, MI

ANN ARBOR FILM FESTIVAL 50 SCREENS

March 9th-April 1st, 2012

Preservation Experiment (Frieze Frame) (2006)

EXPAND: THE ARCHIVE PROJECT

multi-channel video installation Frieze Building, Ann Arbor, MI

A celebration of the historic Frieze Building before it was demolished. With both audio and visual contributions from the community, and sound compiled by Heather Radke, Frieze Frame projected archival images of the building onto its facade. The work created a space for viewers to reflect on the personal and collective experience of a long-standing architectural landmark that was soon to disappear.

HAVE IT YOUR WAY (2008)

18 min. loop, nine-channel video 1482 N. Milwaukee, Chicago IL May 2-3, 2008

A si te -specific video installation, using multiple projectors to  illuminate a now demolished building in the Wicker Park neighborhood of Chicago. All the footage derives from the surrounding space, and the silhouettes represent how the physical body absorbs the urban environment.

After All the Tragedies are Over (2009)

Collaboration w/ Kate Clark & Ben Love OX-BOW AT WORK, Saugatuck, MI

A collaborative work using multiple sculptural elements inspired by the themes of a D. H. Lawrence poem.

The primary structure utilizes a pin-hole technique, as viewers peer  into a mysterious nautical world, centered around a found canoe skeleton.

 

AFTER ALL THE TRAGEDIES ARE OVER--

After all the tragedies are over and worn out and a man can no longer feel heroic about being a Hamlet--

When love is gone, and desire is dead, and tragedy has left the heart then grief and pain go too, withdrawing from the heart and leaving strange cold stretches of sand.

So a man no longer knows his own heart; he might say into the twilight: What is it? I am here, yet m y heart is bare and utterly empty. I have passed from existence, I feel nothing any more. I am a nonentity.- -

Yet, when the time has come to be nothing, how good it is to be nothing! a waste expanse of nothing, like wide foreshores where not a ripple is left and the sea is lost in the lapse of the lowest of tides.

Ah, when I have seen myself left by life, left nothing!

Yet, even waste, grey foreshores, sand, and sorry far out clay are sea-bread still, through their hour of bare denuding.

It is the moon that turns the tides. The beaches can do nothing about it.

-D.H. Lawrence (Pansies, 1929)

Untitled Train Installation (2005)

20 min. loop, two channel video Bandamer Park, Ann Arbor, MI, December 2005

An installation located at a cross-section of movement and transportation, using imagery from the surrounding space to comment on the ever-changing landscape. The work uses a passing train as a projection surface to explore the ephemerality of the art experience.

Home/Life Experiment/Performance (2006)

EXPAND: THE ARCHIVE PROJECT

3 hours, 8 channel video installation 205 N. Division, Ann Arbor, MI April 13, 2006

An exploration of the relationship between the physical body, archit ecture, and the internalized understanding of home. The work projects images of domestic spaces onto the windows of the artist's actual home.

Womb Experiment (2006)

EXPAND: THE ARCHIVE PROJECT

22 min., nine video projectors, Angell Hall Planetarium, UM Campus, April 24, 2006

A disjointed, yet synced, 360-degree image with nine projectors, utilizing the architecture of the planetarium to envelop the viewer.

With sound by Tom Meluch, and performers from the University of Michigan Dance Department, the work uses fetal development as a structuring device to create a womb-like atmosphere.

Shine (2016)
CityShine Photos
IMG_6948.jpg
42˚57'43"N, 85˚40'14"W (2010)
Blue Green (2007-2011)
I Will Always Love You (2012)
Preservation Experiment (Frieze Frame) (2006)
HAVE IT YOUR WAY (2008)
After All the Tragedies are Over (2009)
Untitled Train Installation (2005)
Home/Life Experiment/Performance (2006)
Womb Experiment (2006)